Thhe work of digital collage artist, Moira Law, is inspired by the gifts of the world around her that have touched her in her travels. She invites the viewer to share that appreciation and enter into an oasis of beauty, a haven from the chaos of modern
living, a mini holiday from the turmoil of the real world. She also delights in finding beauty in surprising places where you might least expect it, overlaying now faded glory with a patina of nostalgia.

Born into a nomadic life, Law has always relished travel. Before the age of six, she had already crossed the North American continent four times. Law was an anomaly in her family where the interest of her parents and sister turned toward classical music and accounting rather than to fine art. Her childhood was a rich one, filled with travel, music and literature but she was not exposed to art as a child. Accordingly as a young woman, she opted for a degree in literature and a career in the business world. Even so, she
managed to focus her work on writing, which at least offered some outlet for her hidden but insistent creative instincts.

True to her nature, her work had her travelling across the country and it was during a business trip to Quebec City that she met the handsome young pilot who became
her husband. They lived in Québec City, Germany, Montréal and Ottawa before retiring to a small forest in Mountain Township. During their time in Germany they traveled extensively and along with her German Language Studies, Law took a program in French
Civilization at Strasbourg University, which included an art history course. She was hooked.

After that, subsequent travels focused on the many art galleries in France, Germany, Italy and England. And she helped organize a group of military wives to establish an art
boutique in the Canadian community for the group to sell their work. Law sold her wall
hangings, as she had continued to experiment with different art forms: weaving, hand spinning, fibre dyeing, needlework, ceramics, crochet, knitting, gardening, flower
arranging, cooking and photography. But it was several years later, back in Canada, when the digital revolution hit the photographic industry that she finally found her true medium. As soon as digital single lens reflex cameras became affordable, Law
bought one and returned to her earlier photographic pursuits. Her first teachers were friends; Frank Reiter who tutored her in photography and Wendy Stevenson
introduced her to Adobe Photoshop. She read books on photography and
studied on-line as well with Scott Kelby, Zack Arias, Sue Bryce, and many other instructors on Lynda.com and Creative Live. It was at this time that a friend
persuaded her to try an on-line game called Second Life. As it happened, there was a large art community in Second Life comprising many working artists, gallery owners and art curators. She was able to present her real-life work in this fantasy environment
where it brought her praise and encouragement. As she continued to hone her skills she discovered a book, “The Art of Photoshop” by Daniel Giordan that caused a complete change of direction. She was enchanted with the idea of creating art with the use of digital photographs and software. Again, she set out to learn as much as possible from instructors like Lesa Snider, Lindsay Adler, David Duchemin, Doug Landreth and
Sebastian Michaels. She wanted to see if she could create something like the encaustic work she first saw in a local art show and was drawn to. She attended several
local artists’ workshops to learn more about how encaustic was created.

Later, her sister-in-law, Québec painter and sculptor Nicole Duprès, offered her a
weekend workshop in abstract painting. This experience inspired her to add more abstract elements to her work through the use of brushes and other digital content.
Her subsequent development of an appreciation for negative space helped her
refine her style and find her voice. Her pieces resemble mixed media collages of photographic and other elements coupled with a strong component of white space,
typical of her distinctive style.

Law’s creations emerge from her subconscious as she creates them. She says she doesn’t know in advance what the final piece will be. When working she feels almost as
if she passes into an altered state and time slips by without her awareness. While she may eventually tire of other activities if she pursues them for too long, she says, with her work that never happens.

Original Photograph by Moira Law
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Artwork Recently Sold
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